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 Post subject: Snow booties?
PostPosted: Tue Nov 17, 2015 11:30 am 
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I would love some advise from you guys on whether I should buy snow booties for my Tara. We live in Sunnyvale, CA where it's temperate year round. We're heading to Mount Shasta for Thanksgiving and there's a lot of snow! They also salt the roads. Since Tara is acclimated to a temperate climate, what is the best thing for her? I see pics of other cockers running around in the snow without boots, but maybe they've had time to adjust? I'm originally from Michigan, but my blood is thinned out here in California. I definitely get cold when I visit home. How will Tara do? I have a sweater and a coat for her. Any other suggestions? Thanks!


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 Post subject: Re: Snow booties?
PostPosted: Tue Nov 17, 2015 12:09 pm 
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How cold that night was, we got to the ski lodge and my and my son pants we had instantly frozen pants all it took was less than four steps onto the parking lot to pay the overnight fee at the lodge.

All I can say we stayed in the parking lot one Friday night at Boral Ridge Ski right after a storm. They claimed it was the coldest night at -12'. My truck was frozen solid. About 1AM my wife found her frozen shoes and opened up the camper door walked the parking lot for Jenny to pee, at never happened. Jenny came back shaking and I pulled her into my sleeping bag.

That AM we drove to Truckee had breakfast and I put Jenny in my sons jacket as we left her inside my truck.

Do you need booties it depends what your going to do.

Joe


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 Post subject: Re: Snow booties?
PostPosted: Tue Nov 17, 2015 1:04 pm 
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Hi there!

I used to live in DC, which has fairly mild winters and once or twice we had a lot of snow. Tons of salt everywhere too. The salt and the ice that gets packed into their fur on the paws is uncomfortable. She would lift her paw and want me to scrape the stuff off. So, yes, I would get booties.

In the soft snow though, Cici loved it bouncing around in it!

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Cici - 8 years old (Gotcha Dec 14, 2013)
Raleigh, North Carolina


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 Post subject: Re: Snow booties?
PostPosted: Tue Nov 17, 2015 1:10 pm 
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Thanks Joe! Thanks Cici! I ordered some EPIKS which were recommended on this board. I also put some footies on Tara to see if she'd freeze up. She didn't. Looks like we're in business!


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 Post subject: Re: Snow booties?
PostPosted: Tue Nov 17, 2015 6:19 pm 
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It looks like you're all set. :happy As far as whether booties are needed or not, Oliver loves to run "barepaw" in the snow and never has any issues. The real challenge for us comes with the salt and other deicing stuff people use. The salt crystals don't seem to bother him, but some of the chemical deicing agents make him whimper and frantically shift from foot to foot, which is a pitiful sight.

Enjoy your Thanksgiving travels!


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 Post subject: Re: Snow booties?
PostPosted: Tue Nov 17, 2015 6:57 pm 
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Location: Saint Paul, MN
We get plenty of snow and sub-zero temps up here in Minnesota, and I have attempted snow booties with Hobbes twice and they didn't go over well. He's a Husky at heart though, and has hiked through many a snowy field with no problems at all. It really depends on the dog I believe. It's really not the snow that worries me anyway; the de-icing stuff they put down EVERYWHERE in Minnesota during the winter makes me nervous.

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 Post subject: Re: Snow booties?
PostPosted: Tue Nov 17, 2015 8:31 pm 
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whether or not I put booties on my dogs depends on a few things - how long we'll be out, how much salt/snow is on the ground, how deep it is. To let the dogs out to do their business or a quick walk, I do nothing and wipe paws off w/a damp wash cloth if necessary.

The salt & chemicals are def a problem - I dont want my dogs licking that stuff. So I make a paw wax using coconut oil, shea butter & bees wax and apply before a walk where they might encounter deicing stuff. If the ground is icy, or we're going for a long walk w/lots of chemicals on the ground, I'll put boots on. In deep snow, I've found that the booties tend to get filled with snow and fall off - usually when I'm not looking and have to go back and search them out. For deep snow, I cut the hair on the feet/pads short, apply some wax and know that when we get back, I'm going to be applying a hair dryer to melt the ice balls that always get stuck in their fur.

Hope you have a great trip


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 Post subject: Re: Snow booties?
PostPosted: Wed Nov 18, 2015 12:15 am 
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Don't think Shasta or most of California does not use salt. I know Oregon at one time used volcanic rock but to many cracked windshields.

Clearing the Roadway Surface
Caltrans utilizes snowplows and motor
graders for clearing snow from the
roadway surface. Deicing salt is the
primary agent for ice melting and break­
ing the bond between the snow pack and
the pavement. Abrasives, such as sand
or volcanic cinders, are spread in order
to provide better vehicle trac­
tion. In some areas salt is
applied separately from abra­
sives in order to better control
the location and application
rate. This has proven to signifi­
cantly reduce the amount of
salt used.
District directors are respon­
sible for the judicious use of
salt and other chemicals for
snow and ice control. Through
operator training and usage
logs, the Department has
significantly reduced the amount of
applied deicing salt. Without the use of
an effective deicer such as salt, Caltrans
would need to require more frequent
and extended use of chains by motorists
travelling mountainous routes in the
winter. The use of chains, which requires
lower vehicle operating speeds, com­
bined with the operational problems
Lake Tahoe basin
presented by motorists stopping on the
traveled way to install chains, signifi­
cantly reduces the capacity of the high­
way. Another problem faced is that chain
use on mountain highways contributes to
pavement wear and deterioration of ride
quality.
The control of ice and snow on
mountainous routes involves
balancing the needs of the
travelling public, traffic and
personal safety, and the protec­
tion of the environment.
ENVIRONMENTAL

CONCERNS

Although there is by no means
a consensus of opinion among
experts as to the magnitude of
damage caused by the applica­
tion of deicing salt, it is believed that
deicing salt does cause some vegetation
damage, as well as bridge deck and
vehicle underbody corrosion.
In recognizing the potential for these
kinds of harmful effects, Caltrans has
implemented a reduced salt-use policy
dated October 1989 and required the
transportation districts to develop
specific route by route plans. In the
winter of 1989/90, Caltrans reduced salt
usage by 62 percent statewide as com­
pared to the previous winter. This was
made possible by the combination of a
mild winter and improved control of the
application frequency of deicing salt.

From CalTrans.the latest I could find.

I wouldn't think there be any salt used, unless your in town and walking on the side walks. California doesn't like using any thing harmful on the roads that could pollute like the river. They even had removed the alcohol from the windshield washer fluid in the 90's. by our EPA, can you guess what happened? ICED UP WINDSHIELDS! What happens when you can't see? Record amount crashes regulated by California government. BIG OOPS.

We did lots of skiing in the late 70 and early 80's. They used lots of salt back then on the roads. I would recommend another 5- 6 hours and go to Mt. Bachelor. The best snow west of the Rockies.

Joe


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