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 Post subject: American food supply over the Europeans
PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2014 10:38 am 
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My son's family went to Norway to Germany,then to France to Spain. Rode the bullet train to France then a Disney ship to the Caribbean's from Spain. His wife took a kitchen tour on the Disney ship and the chef stated that American's have a food digestion problems. Poop issues problems as he hates cooking for American's. No such problems with the Europeans. He thinks it's the GMO's, in the food supply in USA.

This could be the cause of IBS in America. Something I always thought about.


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 Post subject: Re: American food supply over the Europeans
PostPosted: Sat Dec 06, 2014 8:22 am 
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http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/eur ... story.html


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 Post subject: Re: American food supply over the Europeans
PostPosted: Sat Dec 06, 2014 1:11 pm 
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Joe in North Bay Ca wrote:
My son's family went to Norway to Germany,then to France to Spain. Rode the bullet train to France then a Disney ship to the Caribbean's from Spain. His wife took a kitchen tour on the Disney ship and the chef stated that American's have a food digestion problems. Poop issues problems as he hates cooking for American's. No such problems with the Europeans. He thinks it's the GMO's, in the food supply in USA.

This could be the cause of IBS in America. Something I always thought about.




Could be, or it could be all the overly processed junk food that we eat. I work for a major snack food company, I service 10 supermarkets and what needs to be packed out on a daily basis is staggering. Americans love junk food and living in the Northeast when there is a snow storm coming watch out, they want their junk food, and movies to watch. Here is something that you have never thought of, nor do you see it written or talked about. Do you remember Chernobyl back in 86? Not really thinking about it, because we were so far away from it, I went on vacation back in the mid 90's to Russia. They cook a lot of fish and I am not a fish eater, and after the 3rd night of fish and not eating the waiter was a little concerned. Anyways we had a conversation, and what I didn't realize is that the radiation was still there and in the ground where plants grew, all the vegetables and animals were contaminated with it. But it wasn't just there, it was in most of Europe, and it would be there for many years. Talk about a conversation that could take away your appetite. Only vacation I ever took and lost weight. The ground is still radioactive over there and good ole USA has been importing food from these countries and we have been eating this stuff. Over a million people to date have died from this disaster with more to come. The jury is still out on the GMO's but I think I would rather eat that than the other. So for Russia or Europe to balk at our food, they really need to look at what they have in their own back yards.
These were the countries that were hardest hit:
"Nations outside the former Soviet Union received high doses of radioactive fallout, most notably Norway, Sweden, Finland, Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, Austria, Romania, Greece, and parts of the United Kingdom and Germany


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 Post subject: Re: American food supply over the Europeans
PostPosted: Sat Dec 06, 2014 9:02 pm 
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I understand what your saying, but are they the kind of people that would go on a Disney cruse ship? Just a thought.


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 Post subject: Re: American food supply over the Europeans
PostPosted: Mon Dec 08, 2014 3:29 pm 
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I don't know, are you saying that these people who eat the junk food don't go on Disney cruises? I live in the central part of the state and go figure, I work on the shoreline, where the people who have money live. So in the summer you have a lot of transient people, and now you have the ones who live there year round, having one party after another. Yeah, the shelves were bare today, a lot of stuff moves at this time of the year, It will slow down a little after the first of the year, and then will pick up for Easter, and then we're back up in full swing when Memorial Day hits again. Yep,eating crackers, chips, and cookies that's the American way! I never knew how much junk food people ate until I got this job, and that is just one company, there are other ones also, that sell even more than I do. Then don't forget all the dips and cheeses and soda and alcohol to go with the chips and crackers. You have to work it to know.


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 Post subject: Re: American food supply over the Europeans
PostPosted: Fri Dec 12, 2014 9:02 pm 
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Image

Oxfam International has made a graphic showing how a handful of corporations control nearly everything we buy at the grocery store.

The graphic focuses on 10 of the world's most powerful food and beverage companies: Coca-Cola, PepsiCo, Unilever, Danone, Mars, Mondelez International, Kellogg's, General Mills, Nestle, and Associated British Foods.

Oxfam calls these companies the Big 10 and keeps a scorecard on their environmental impact on a website devoted to the nonprofit's "Behind the Brands" campaign.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/10-compa ... z3LkdEPWAR


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 Post subject: Re: American food supply over the Europeans
PostPosted: Sun Dec 14, 2014 10:45 am 
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That chart is fascinating----and frightening. I thought it was only Big Pharm we had to be afraid of.

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 Post subject: Re: American food supply over the Europeans
PostPosted: Sun Dec 14, 2014 7:32 pm 
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So I decided to check out the "organic's" companies, since I do represent one of those that my company owns. This is a chart of what has happened to the organic companies in the last 20 years. Out of 81 there are only 15 independent ones left, and how long will they stay independent?

http://mic.com/articles/82881/the-truth ... -one-chart


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 Post subject: Re: American food supply over the Europeans
PostPosted: Tue Dec 16, 2014 12:55 pm 
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If you make your own it will always be independent, I watched a documentary on Chernobyl and all the animals that live there. Despite the high radiation all the wildlife was thriving with no deformities in the offspring. They decided that a good natural diet was enough to cancel out most of the effects of radiation.


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 Post subject: Re: American food supply over the Europeans
PostPosted: Wed Dec 17, 2014 5:36 am 
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I spent a good amount of my growing years on my aunt's farm in upstate New York. Across the road from her lived another farm family (sister and two brothers) that were already old. I'd go there every morning to bring them fresh, raw milk from one of my aunt's cows for their day's use. Emmie used to save her bacon/sausage grease in an old can and let it harden in her pantry. When it was filled, she'd extrude the cylinder of fat, slice it into 1" slices, dip them into corn meal and them toss them on the wood stove till the fat melted enough to crisp up the corn meal. She would serve that with their usual breakfast of a dozen eggs, pancakes with butter and syrup, bacon, sausage, coffee by the gallon, homemade bread or baked goods. Emmie lived to be 98 - she was the hardy one. Both brothers died in their early 90's.

They worked HARD (anyone that doesn't think a farmer works hard is deluded) and they worked long days. Their bodies set the rhythm; up at sunrise, in bed with the dark. They always seemed to be satisfied with what they had. They laughed a lot. They were kind, gentle people. I never heard them say a nasty thing about anything or anyone. The closest they came was during an election when they boycotted voting saying, "neither one of those boys deserve the vote. We'll wait three years and try it then."

There is more than eating well that counts. It's our stress loads which weaken our systems, it's our not letting our bodies rest, it's twisted, fad diets that throw off the bodies balance, it's taking meds for stuff you really don't need to "keep the cold from going into bronchitis" or whatever.

Anyone that says that food is the only factor in determining our overall health is looking at only half a picture.

_________________
Teddy - 11/11/03
Annie - 2/13/05
Jennie - Gotcha 9/14/11
Cody - 9/2/08
Monkey Cat - 1993 - 2013
Cori - My First - 1/2/91 - 12/15/03
Maxine - My Angel - Gotcha - 9/5/09 - 7/28/11
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 Post subject: Re: American food supply over the Europeans
PostPosted: Wed Dec 17, 2014 12:20 pm 
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Vickie wrote:
I spent a good amount of my growing years on my aunt's farm in upstate New York. Across the road from her lived another farm family (sister and two brothers) that were already old. I'd go there every morning to bring them fresh, raw milk from one of my aunt's cows for their day's use. Emmie used to save her bacon/sausage grease in an old can and let it harden in her pantry. When it was filled, she'd extrude the cylinder of fat, slice it into 1" slices, dip them into corn meal and them toss them on the wood stove till the fat melted enough to crisp up the corn meal. She would serve that with their usual breakfast of a dozen eggs, pancakes with butter and syrup, bacon, sausage, coffee by the gallon, homemade bread or baked goods. Emmie lived to be 98 - she was the hardy one. Both brothers died in their early 90's.

They worked HARD (anyone that doesn't think a farmer works hard is deluded) and they worked long days. Their bodies set the rhythm; up at sunrise, in bed with the dark. They always seemed to be satisfied with what they had. They laughed a lot. They were kind, gentle people. I never heard them say a nasty thing about anything or anyone. The closest they came was during an election when they boycotted voting saying, "neither one of those boys deserve the vote. We'll wait three years and try it then."

There is more than eating well that counts. It's our stress loads which weaken our systems, it's our not letting our bodies rest, it's twisted, fad diets that throw off the bodies balance, it's taking meds for stuff you really don't need to "keep the cold from going into bronchitis" or whatever.

Anyone that says that food is the only factor in determining our overall health is looking at only half a picture.

James likes this quote, I will be dead soon stressed out of my mind most of the time. :sad


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 Post subject: Re: American food supply over the Europeans
PostPosted: Wed Dec 17, 2014 2:03 pm 
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I couldn't agree more on the stress factor, Vickie, that was something that I was going to bring up, as well as food intolerance's. I was diagnosed late in life with milk and wheat intolerance. Strange too, is that I am of European descent, and come from the area that the people have the mutated gene to be able to drink it without a problem. Didn't get that mutation. If you ever look at the ingredients on packaged stuff, most are made with milk, so that lets out a whole lot of food for me.
I would love to create a little farm for myself, to be self reliant, but like you said, they worked hard, and I grew up around farms as a kid, and I knew all the hard work they put into farming, and I am just not up to doing that. If there is ever a big catastrophe, they will be the survivors, and us people that rely on the stores, we will be in for a rude awakening.
James, yes I know about the documentary on the animals living there in Chernobyl, but either they didn't mention it or you missed that part, the animals have been tested and they have high radiation levels. Some animals do OK others don't. Some plants grow OK others don't. Scientist have been studying this and will continue to do so. As I mentioned Finland was hit really hard by the fallout and they still will not allow hunting and eating wildlife, due to the high radiation levels that the wildlife has. Makes one wonder, how their domesticated livestock would test, if they test.


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 Post subject: Re: American food supply over the Europeans
PostPosted: Wed Dec 17, 2014 4:37 pm 
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James wrote:
Vickie wrote:
I spent a good amount of my growing years on my aunt's farm in upstate New York. Across the road from her lived another farm family (sister and two brothers) that were already old. I'd go there every morning to bring them fresh, raw milk from one of my aunt's cows for their day's use. Emmie used to save her bacon/sausage grease in an old can and let it harden in her pantry. When it was filled, she'd extrude the cylinder of fat, slice it into 1" slices, dip them into corn meal and them toss them on the wood stove till the fat melted enough to crisp up the corn meal. She would serve that with their usual breakfast of a dozen eggs, pancakes with butter and syrup, bacon, sausage, coffee by the gallon, homemade bread or baked goods. Emmie lived to be 98 - she was the hardy one. Both brothers died in their early 90's.

They worked HARD (anyone that doesn't think a farmer works hard is deluded) and they worked long days. Their bodies set the rhythm; up at sunrise, in bed with the dark. They always seemed to be satisfied with what they had. They laughed a lot. They were kind, gentle people. I never heard them say a nasty thing about anything or anyone. The closest they came was during an election when they boycotted voting saying, "neither one of those boys deserve the vote. We'll wait three years and try it then."

There is more than eating well that counts. It's our stress loads which weaken our systems, it's our not letting our bodies rest, it's twisted, fad diets that throw off the bodies balance, it's taking meds for stuff you really don't need to "keep the cold from going into bronchitis" or whatever.

Anyone that says that food is the only factor in determining our overall health is looking at only half a picture.

James likes this quote, I will be dead soon stressed out of my mind most of the time. :sad


Good Lord, I hope not! Calm down! :OMY

_________________
Teddy - 11/11/03
Annie - 2/13/05
Jennie - Gotcha 9/14/11
Cody - 9/2/08
Monkey Cat - 1993 - 2013
Cori - My First - 1/2/91 - 12/15/03
Maxine - My Angel - Gotcha - 9/5/09 - 7/28/11
Maddie - Good Boy - Gotcha 6/17/12 - 7/25/13


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 Post subject: Re: American food supply over the Europeans
PostPosted: Tue Dec 23, 2014 12:28 pm 
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Being active and having no stress is important, but food is also very important.
Radiation is NOT a huge issue in Europe or in countries neighboring Ukraine. Yes there's still high radioactivity in the Charnobyl region, but overall not much outside the larger zone, and most certainly not a big deal in neighboring countries. I wouldn't buy food from the region with high radiation in the soil, but I didn't see any data that would indicate people in neighboring countries suffer because of the fallout or have traces of radiation in their soil. Let's not twist facts or paint Europe in the negative light, because most certainly food from most of Europe is very safe.
Whatever traces of radioacivity in European soil are present (if any), it's not as bad as the GMO, pesticides and antibiotics that are used to produce almost all food in the USA. Not only in food but also contaminating our water and air. The bottom line results are seen in life expectancy, healthcare costs, and life quality. While there's no verdict on GMOs, such food itself has a different molecular and genetic composition than what our bodies have known. At this time we know that food and other environmental factors can turn off or turn on genes that are within us. While GMO can be a life saver when there's not enough food available, it doesn't mean we shouldn't be prevented from making a conscious decision about what we eat. IF someone wants to eat GMO they should have the right to, but I want ALL food to be labeled so that I can make a conscious choice.

About junk food. Europeans eat some junk food as well, but the attitude that "green food is yucky" , to my knowledge, is instilled in children in USA only. Certainly the attitude changes based on demographic and socioeconomic status. Humans around the globe had a variety of different, and at the same time healthy diets. The most common aspects of all healthy diets are variety and moderation.


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